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Communicating with Dying People and their Relatives

Communicating with Dying People and their Relatives

  • 4995


This book is primarily directed to nurses, but Jean Lugton's expertise in educating and training health visitors from many backgrounds means that all people who are involved in the care of the dying will find this book an inspiring experience and an invaluable resource.

  • Edited By: Jean Lugton
  • Published Date: January 1, 2001
  • Publisher: Ausmed Publications
  • ISBN: 0-9579879-7-6

Overview

"Knowledge of how people relate to their experience of illness is more important than information about the particular disease that will cause them to die." - Jean Lugton

These words, taken from the opening chapter of the book, capture Jean Lugton's philosophy and purpose in writing this excellent book. This is a person-centred book, not a disease-centred book. This is about the person who has the disease; this is not about the disease the person has.

Every person who received a diagnosis of a terminal illness responds in an intensely personal way. No person reacts in exactly the same way as another. But the need to communicate, in one way or another, is universal. Some will be eager to communicate their feelings and hopes and fears; others will be more reserved. However, the need to communicate is universal. The importance of communication is undeniable. Communicating with dying people can bring comfort that goes far beyond the words that are communicated. A person with terminal illness poignantly captured what her carer meant to her: "She is my lifeline. I know she's there. I suppose it's a bit like a kid with a night light. You know it's there if you want it ... she makes all the difference."

Jean Lugton's many years of outstanding study and practice in this field fit her well to write this valuable book on communicating with dying people and their relatives. The book begins with an excellent opening chapter on the general subject of terminal illness. It then moves on to discuss the importance of nurses caring for themselves in their stressful professional lives. Subsequent chapters provide brilliant practical advice on how to break bad news, plan support for families and friends, and make communications more effective. A feature of the book is the series of helpful and stimulating questions at the end of each chapter, which encourage reflection, discussion and learning.

The book is primarily directed to nurses, but Jean Lugton's expertise in educating and training health visitors from many backgrounds means that all people who are involved in the care of the dying will find this book an inspiring experience and an invaluable resource. Ausmed Publications is delighted to publish this Australia edition of Communicating with Dying People and their Relatives. Ausmed is dedicated to the empowerment of nurses through knowledge, and this book continues Ausmed's tradition of quality international textbooks of practical knowledge.

Key Features

  • This is a person-centred book, not a disease-centred book.
  • Learn how to communicate appropriately with dying people.
  • Addresses the need to plan support for family and close friends.
  • Learn how to prepare relatives for bereavement and bad news.
  • Assist staff to deal with issues that arise.

About the Author

Jean Lugton

Jean Lugton PhD MA (Hons) MSc SRN RNT is a Health Visitor and External Examiner for the Specialist Course in Palliative Care at Dundee University. She trained as a nurse in Liverpool, where she was a ward sister for four years before qualifying as a nurse teacher in Edinburgh, and taking her Sociology honours degree. She worked as a nurse teacher in North Lothian College whilst completing her MSc thesis. Then, when Education Officer at St Columba's Hospice in Edinburgh, she developed the first courses in palliative nursing in Scotland and undertook a research study exploring the support needs of relatives of Hospice patients. The Hospice now offers a degree course in Nursing Studies: Palliative Care. Later, as a Macmillan Research Fellow, she undertook her PhD, exploring the complementary roles professional and informal support for patients with breast cancer. Recently, following an invitation from nursing bodies in Japan, she has lectured there on palliative care.


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