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Keeping in Touch with Someone Who has Alzheimer's

Keeping in Touch with Someone Who has Alzheimer's

  • 2995


This book is a joy to read and a resource to dip into for ideas about how you, the family member or professional carer, can celebrate and value the lives of those who have dementia.

  • Edited By: Dr Jane Crisp
  • Published Date: March 1, 2002
  • Publisher: Ausmed Publications
  • ISBN: 0-9577988-2-2

Overview

Jane Crisp writes in an easy-to-read fashion about the way she kept in touch with the mother she loved and valued. She gives practical ideas for how we can involve someone we love in our daily activities even when popular opinion would throw them on the scrapheap. This book is a joy to read and a resource to dip into for ideas about how you, the family member or professional carer, can celebrate and value the lives of those who have dementia.

Key Features

  • Practical ideas for how we can involve someone we love in our daily activities; even when popular opinion would throw them on the scrap heap
  • This book is a joy to read and a resource to dip into for ideas about how you, the family member or the professional carer, can celebrate and value the lives of those who have dementia
  • Discusses the imagination and ingenuity required in formulating strategies to compensate for another person’s challenges and to make our contact with them rewarding and worthwhile
  • Offers encouragement to all engaging with someone who has Alzheimers Disease, by directing them to reflect and learn from their experience

About the Author

Dr Jane Crisp

Dr Jane Crisp retired recently as a lecturer in communication, media studies and women’s studies at Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia. She now holds an honorary position there as Adjunct Senior Lecturer.

When Jane’s mother, who lived in New Zealand, was diagnosed with dementia, Jane found her professional studies of great help in her efforts to keep in touch. Since 1990, Jane has been studying the language of people who are dementing, working out strategies for making sense of the way they speak. She has given talks on this work, and had articles published, both in Australia and overseas. She has spent much time in France, meeting and exchanging ideas with researchers and carers involved with people who are dementing, and visiting specialised care units.


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